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Thread: Quality coaching

  1. #1

    Quality coaching

    Quality coaching makes a dramatic difference.

    Quality coaching puts players in the best position to be successful. Every player doesn't have to be great at everything; quality coaches put players in the best position to utilize their talents in one or two things.

    When was the last time you believed the Raiders overachieved, based on the talent on the roster? This has not happened even once in the past couple of decades. Until the days of a very young Jon Gruden and a defense led by Willie Shaw, this team has not overachieved.

    You can't tell me that a quality coach can't find ways to get the ball to a 6-6 tight end who outruns wide receivers and defensive backs. You can't tell me that there is no way to use Marcus Mariota at least in a limited capacity to make defenses watch for a quarterback run on short yardage plays. You can't tell me that a quality offensive playbook can't find a way to get the ball at least once in the passing game to Bryan Edwards, a huge, strong wide receiver who might not be the fastest but has a catch radius as large as anyone in the NFL. All of this points to terrible coaching.

    While I believe Carr is part of the problem, I also know that coaching has been a consistent problem. Our defense with Mullen, Hobbs and Casey Harward was on its way to being a top 10 defense. Without Mullen and the injuries to Nick Morrow and others dropped this defense to a middle of the pack, which is still a dramatic improvement over last year's defense. Gus Bradly has done a good job with this defense. The reason this team is 5-5 is not because of the defense.

    I learned the importance of quality coaching as a junior in high school. I took over an elementary basketball team two thirds of the way through the season. This was clearly the least talented team in the entire league. They hadn't won a game all year. They were losing by double digits every single game. When I took over, I focused on instilling confidence in these young players, as well as drilling them on the fundamentals. I also focused on things that might give us a little bit of an edge, such as always putting their hands up on defense and never taking a shot unless the player was inside the foul line. I taught them a 2-3 defense, as well as a box and one when we played teams with one dominating player. I wanted every edge I could get because I knew we would need them to be even halfway competitive.

    After not winning a game all regular season long, we actually came in second place in the after-season tournament, losing the championship game by only three points. Something clicked in that tournament. Players who a month earlier KNEW they were going to lose suddenly turned around and won three games in the tournament.

    Quality coaching makes a difference, whether you're talking about youth basketball or NFL football.

    Our players have lost confidence. Our players are not being put in a position to be successful, especially on offense. We are no longer innovative; we are predictable.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by raiderman41 View Post
    Quality coaching makes a dramatic difference.

    Quality coaching puts players in the best position to be successful. Every player doesn't have to be great at everything; quality coaches put players in the best position to utilize their talents in one or two things.

    When was the last time you believed the Raiders overachieved, based on the talent on the roster? This has not happened even once in the past couple of decades. Until the days of a very young Jon Gruden and a defense led by Willie Shaw, this team has not overachieved.

    You can't tell me that a quality coach can't find ways to get the ball to a 6-6 tight end who outruns wide receivers and defensive backs. You can't tell me that there is no way to use Marcus Mariota at least in a limited capacity to make defenses watch for a quarterback run on short yardage plays. You can't tell me that a quality offensive playbook can't find a way to get the ball at least once in the passing game to Bryan Edwards, a huge, strong wide receiver who might not be the fastest but has a catch radius as large as anyone in the NFL. All of this points to terrible coaching.

    While I believe Carr is part of the problem, I also know that coaching has been a consistent problem. Our defense with Mullen, Hobbs and Casey Harward was on its way to being a top 10 defense. Without Mullen and the injuries to Nick Morrow and others dropped this defense to a middle of the pack, which is still a dramatic improvement over last year's defense. Gus Bradly has done a good job with this defense. The reason this team is 5-5 is not because of the defense.

    I learned the importance of quality coaching as a junior in high school. I took over an elementary basketball team two thirds of the way through the season. This was clearly the least talented team in the entire league. They hadn't won a game all year. They were losing by double digits every single game. When I took over, I focused on instilling confidence in these young players, as well as drilling them on the fundamentals. I also focused on things that might give us a little bit of an edge, such as always putting their hands up on defense and never taking a shot unless the player was inside the foul line. I taught them a 2-3 defense, as well as a box and one when we played teams with one dominating player. I wanted every edge I could get because I knew we would need them to be even halfway competitive.

    After not winning a game all regular season long, we actually came in second place in the after-season tournament, losing the championship game by only three points. Something clicked in that tournament. Players who a month earlier KNEW they were going to lose suddenly turned around and won three games in the tournament.

    Quality coaching makes a difference, whether you're talking about youth basketball or NFL football.

    Our players have lost confidence. Our players are not being put in a position to be successful, especially on offense. We are no longer innovative; we are predictable.
    rich basaccia is nothing but assistant type coach, players love him but they won't follow him imo

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by mstrbass2000 View Post
    rich basaccia is nothing but assistant type coach, players love him but they won't follow him imo
    How many head coaching positions has Rich been interviewed for in the past 5 years?

    None.

    Why? He's a good special teams coach. The players like him.

    But he is not head coaching material.

    Name one successful NFL coach in its entire history who was a special teams coach immediately before being named head coach.

    I can't think of one either.

  4. #4
    When have we overachieved? 2016.. but that was more to do with luck than coaching. Although our OC that year was doing an incredible job... then bad luck came when Carr went down right around Christmas. That was a shitty Christmas for sure.

  5. #5
    Give Bradley the head coach job? Let him start fresh at QB?

  6. #6
    Depends on what you classify as overachieving and how many wins they should've gotten. 2016 they overchieved big time...by about 5 wins. That was a 7 or 8 win team at best and Carr and Mack made that team better. I'd also say the 2019 and 2020. The 2019 roster was a 5 win team and we won 7. The 2020 roster was a 5 or 6 win team and we won 8. The late season collapses were because the rosters weren't good, same as this year. Overachieve early, teams get film on us, then we get exploited. This team, this roster, is average at best. They were probably going to win 8 or 9 games with Gruden and Ruggs. Gruden did us no favors in the building of this team.

  7. #7
    All I know is that we gotta beat other teams to the punch. Denver will have a HC opening. As well as the Bears and maybe the Giants. If Rodgers and Wilson leave their current teams it could add to the mix of the coaching carousel. Raiders would have probably been the most attractive spot to land for a good coach, but after losing deep threat (or at least decoy) Ruggs and Derek showcasing once again he self-destructs when the going gets tough could make things worse.

    If we sign a top FA WR like Adams or Robinson though it could help sway things back in our favor. Plus getting a veteran RT and C would help as well. Defense is serviceable unless the new coach wants his own D Coordinator.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Raiderjohn622 View Post
    Give Bradley the head coach job? Let him start fresh at QB?
    gus bradley is a failed head coach he also refused to play 2 deep safety vs kc while getting his head handed to him despite the 2 deep safety defense basically being able to shut down kc's offense all yr long...no thanks

    I want us to go after josh mcdaniels what he has been able to do with new englands offense is amazing and its not just this yr either dudes proven to be great at offensive planning and adjusting

  9. #9
    IF memory serves me correctly, hasn't McDaniels tuned down interviews because he's the next head coach in New England once Belichek steps down?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Trophy81 View Post
    IF memory serves me correctly, hasn't McDaniels tuned down interviews because he's the next head coach in New England once Belichek steps down?
    Yes, but money and team control talk.

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