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Thread: Got my Moderna vaccine yesterday.

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by rabidraider View Post
    No thanks needed. You are 100% correct. We watch everyone for 15 minutes and 30 minutes if they have an allergy history. After that free to go. Reactions are very rare. Younger people have a stronger immune response and can get the sub clinical blas for a day but the older you are less chance. If a person had Covid the vaccine can give you a rough couple of days. Your parents will do fine.
    Thank you sir!

  2. #12
    FYI, some of the data I'm seeing is that it looks like full immunity at around two weeks post 1st vaccine for most. 2nd vaccine is still necessary for longer immunity. And this is for the mRNA vaccines.

    I have done 8 shifts with 6 at a super center and not one person needed any treatment for whats its worth.

  3. #13
    Administrator bk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabidraider View Post
    FYI, some of the data I'm seeing is that it looks like full immunity at around two weeks post 1st vaccine for most. 2nd vaccine is still necessary for longer immunity. And this is for the mRNA vaccines.

    I have done 8 shifts with 6 at a super center and not one person needed any treatment for whats its worth.
    Appreciate all your input.

    Long story but my mom recently caught COVID while recovering from a stroke. Do you happen to know if it is recommended to get a vaccine for those that have recovered from Covid? Or do their bodies automatically develop the necessary antibodies to fight Covid in the future?
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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by bk View Post
    Appreciate all your input.

    Long story but my mom recently caught COVID while recovering from a stroke. Do you happen to know if it is recommended to get a vaccine for those that have recovered from Covid? Or do their bodies automatically develop the necessary antibodies to fight Covid in the future?
    Absolutely yes, but 90 days after recovery. They believe antibodies from Covid don't last more than a few months. We make sure these patients have checked with their primary physician. All so far want them to get the vaccine. I have administered vaccine to post covid patients. Unfortunately those who had covid who get both the first and second dose tend to get some strong sub clinical symptoms like fever, aches, weakness. But nothing life threatening. All the best to your mom.


    In a study published today, 75000 patients given any of the covid vaccine have had 0 deaths and only a few covid hospitalizations none more than 28 days. In the control group of any 75000 adults there would be 150 deaths and hundreds of hospitalization.

    Very good news published from NY Times:

    Here’s the key fact: All five vaccines with public results have eliminated Covid-19 deaths. They have also drastically reduced hospitalizations. “They’re all good trial results,” Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. “It’s great news.”

    Many people are instead focusing on relatively minor differences among the vaccine results and wrongly assuming that those differences mean that some vaccines won’t prevent serious illnesses. It’s still too early to be sure, because a few of the vaccine makers have released only a small amount of data. But the available data is very encouraging — including about the vaccines’ effect on the virus’s variants.

    “The vaccines are poised to deliver what people so desperately want: an end, however protracted, to this pandemic,” as Julia Marcus of Harvard Medical School recently wrote in The Atlantic.

    Why is the public understanding more negative than it should be? Much of the confusion revolves around the meaning of the word “effective.”
    What do we care about?

    In the official language of research science, a vaccine is typically considered effective only if it prevents people from coming down with any degree of illness. With a disease that’s always or usually horrible, like ebola or rabies, that definition is also the most meaningful one.

    But it’s not the most meaningful definition for most coronavirus infections.

    Whether you realize it or not, you have almost certainly had a coronavirus. Coronaviruses have been circulating for decades if not centuries, and they’re often mild. The common cold can be a coronavirus. The world isn’t going to eliminate coronaviruses — or this particular one, known as SARS-CoV-2 — anytime soon.

    Yet we don’t need to eliminate it for life to return to normal. We instead need to downgrade it from a deadly pandemic to a normal virus. Once that happens, adults can go back to work, and children back to school. Grandparents can nuzzle their grandchildren, and you can meet your friends at a restaurant.

    As Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, told me this weekend: “I don’t actually care about infections. I care about hospitalizations and deaths and long-term complications.”
    The data

    By those measures, all five of the vaccines — from Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax and Johnson & Johnson — look extremely good. Of the roughly 75,000 people who have received one of the five in a research trial, not a single person has died from Covid, and only a few people appear to have been hospitalized. None have remained hospitalized 28 days after receiving a shot.

    To put that in perspective, it helps to think about what Covid has done so far to a representative group of 75,000 American adults: It has killed roughly 150 of them and sent several hundred more to the hospital. The vaccines reduce those numbers to zero and nearly zero, based on the research trials.

    Zero isn’t even the most relevant benchmark. A typical U.S. flu season kills between five and 15 out of every 75,000 adults and hospitalizes more than 100 of them.

    I assume you would agree that any vaccine that transforms Covid into something much milder than a typical flu deserves to be called effective. But that is not the scientific definition. When you read that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 66 percent effective or that the Novavax vaccine was 89 percent effective, those numbers are referring to the prevention of all illness. They count mild symptoms as a failure.

    “In terms of the severe outcomes, which is what we really care about, the news is fantastic,” Dr. Aaron Richterman, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, said.
    The variants


    What about the highly contagious new virus variants that have emerged in Britain, Brazil and South Africa? The South African variant does appear to make the vaccines less effective at eliminating infections.

    Fortunately, there is no evidence yet that it increases deaths among vaccinated people. Two of the five vaccines — from Johnson & Johnson and Novavax — have reported some results from South Africa, and none of the people there who received a vaccine died of Covid. “People are still not getting serious illness. They’re still not dying,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health told me.

    The most likely reason, epidemiologists say, is that the vaccines still provide considerable protection against the variant, albeit not quite as much as against the original version. Some protection appears to be enough to turn this coronavirus into a fairly normal disease in the vast majority of cases.

    “This variant is clearly making it a little tougher to get the most vigorous response that you would want to have,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said. “But still, for severe disease, it’s looking really good.”
    Last edited by rabidraider; 02-01-2021 at 04:26 AM.

  5. #15

    I contracted COVID in mid-December

    Quote Originally Posted by RF4L View Post
    I am not concerned. I won't be taking the vaccine. I refuse to.
    I went to the doctor on Wednesday, Dec. 16, for a sinus infection and was given antibiotics and a steroid. Three days later, my taste started being a little "funky." I went back to the doctor on Monday because I was actually feeling worse (this never happens when I have a sinus infection, as antibiotics begin turning it around almost immediately) and was tested for COVID. I did the quick test and also the PCR test. The quick test was positive, and the PCR test confirmed the initial results. I truly believe I contracted the virus at my initial doctor's visit.

    I scheduled an online visit with America's Frontline doctors and was prescribed ivermectin, an anti-viral, anti-parasite drug that has shown tremendous progress in treating the disease. Before I took the first dose of the drug on Thursday, December 24, at 4 p.m., I was couch-ridden, had trouble sleeping, had no energy, my appetite was gone and my sense of taste and smell were gone, too. I was also developing a cough. Within two hours of taking the drug, my sense of taste and smell started coming back and I began getting my appetite back. By Sunday, December 27, I was back working out (I lift weights and ride an exercise bike) although I was still a little tired. By the following Wednesday, I was able to do my complete weight workout as usual.

    I have also talked with people who have taken hydroxychloroquine with similar, near-immediate turnarounds. I truly believe that this virus can be beaten with these drugs, as long as they are given early enough in the viral load. I also took zinc and Vitamins D and C with ivermectin. I also believe that since I was already on an antibiotic kept me from developing a lung infection or pneumonia with the COVID.

    I'm 62 and in decent shape, but since I am older my risk from this disease is greater than someone a lot younger.

  6. #16
    Still spreading fake news about the virus. Shameful.

  7. #17
    Full disclosure. So Thursday I got my second Moderna vaccine. It gave me sub clinical symptoms for about 36 hours. Not a fun time, but worth it.

  8. #18
    Administrator bk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabidraider View Post
    Full disclosure. So Thursday I got my second Moderna vaccine. It gave me sub clinical symptoms for about 36 hours. Not a fun time, but worth it.
    What kind of symptoms did you experience after the 2nd dose? You good now?
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  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by bk View Post
    What kind of symptoms did you experience after the 2nd dose? You good now?
    I'm back to 100%. Did 20 miles on the bike today. Nothing the first 12 hours, really sore arm, achy, low grade fever, tired and a headache. At the 24 hour mark improved, but needed a couple of naps, Second night some night sweats and then back to normal.

    Everyone is different. Some people I know had just sore arms. My 24 year old son was in bed for 2 days and was worse than me. Wife just achy and tired. We are all fine now and approaching full immunity. Worth it for the peace of mind alone.

    We didn't do any over the counter relief because I believe you need to let the vaccine and immune system do its thing. At 24 hours post did start taking Tylenol and/or Motrin. Don't take these meds before your vaccinations since they can depress the vaccine.

    Have your mom wait at least the minimum 90 days before getting her first vaccine. Those who had covid get their butts kicked pretty good with both the first and second shots. One question I have to ask all patients as part of the vaccination questions is "Have you had covid in the last 90 days"? We don't want to see anyone get their butts kicked unnecessarily.
    Last edited by rabidraider; 02-15-2021 at 02:46 PM.

  10. #20
    “I’ll never stop being amazed at zero hospitalizations among vaccinated in study after study,” Dr. Aaron Richterman of the University of Pennsylvania wrote.

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