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Thread: And here's the sucker Reggie needs to pounce on

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by InfaRaider View Post
    ...And he shredded our D in 2011, but then again who didn't.

    Lol.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by raiders_fan67 View Post
    Trading Palmer would be the stupidest move Reggie could make. Carson needs to redo his contract and give us some relief. Your boy Pryor isn't the answer. Do you think some mobile quarterback will win the Superbowl or maybe Brady,Eli, Matt a pocket passer. Look at the history and let me know
    He already restructured his contract this past off-season. He won't restructure again. Restructuring just means that you delay the money being put on the cap by another year, only for it to compound and get worse in future years. Restructuring doesn't mean a player takes a pay cut, that just doesn't happen. We have enough money coming off the cap this season that Palmer's inflated contract shouldn't be an issue, especially considering guys like Seymour (with a massive cap number) won't be here.
    "If you want something, go get it. Don't let anyone convince you that it's impossible. Make the impossible possible. Do whatever's needed to make it happen. Go at it with both hands, take it in stride, and hit paydirt....."
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  3. #48
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    Chan gailey wants geno smith. If we can stay in the top 5 we have a chance for a huge payday. It won't come until draft day, but hopefully we get their 1st and 2nd of this year.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chewy316 View Post
    He already restructured his contract this past off-season. He won't restructure again. Restructuring just means that you delay the money being put on the cap by another year, only for it to compound and get worse in future years. Restructuring doesn't mean a player takes a pay cut, that just doesn't happen. We have enough money coming off the cap this season that Palmer's inflated contract shouldn't be an issue, especially considering guys like Seymour (with a massive cap number) won't be here.
    It does happen. Tom Brady has done it a few different times.

    Carson has to take a look at his situation. If he still wants to play and is the real leader of this team (like we hear from multiple people) then take a pay cut. If not, there's no reason to justify him staying if we're paying $15 million to him next season. I'm sure Reggie and Carson have already talked about this.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by imthedan View Post
    It does happen. Tom Brady has done it a few different times.

    Carson has to take a look at his situation. If he still wants to play and is the real leader of this team (like we hear from multiple people) then take a pay cut. If not, there's no reason to justify him staying if we're paying $15 million to him next season. I'm sure Reggie and Carson have already talked about this.
    I think you have a misconception about what happens when a player restructures. It DOES NOT mean the player takes a pay cut, it just delays the cap hit. Palmer not restructuring has nothing to do with him being a real leader. It has everything to do with us not really being a contender while Palmer is here. RM recognizes this and will not restructure because of that fact.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by imthedan View Post
    It does happen. Tom Brady has done it a few different times.

    Carson has to take a look at his situation. If he still wants to play and is the real leader of this team (like we hear from multiple people) then take a pay cut. If not, there's no reason to justify him staying if we're paying $15 million to him next season. I'm sure Reggie and Carson have already talked about this.
    Nobody ever has or ever will restructure to take a pay cut.They always get more money and or years guaranteed.They might take a cut this season to get more years guaranteed and some moved to a signing bonus for immediate cap relief.In the long run they get their money and then some.The only way to re work his contract now would be to guarantee his money way past his usefulness.Thats how we got in this mess in the 1st place.We have been among the worst at managing the cap for years and now its time to pay the piper
    foodisgood70 likes this.

  7. #52
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    Here to help let you see what is likely coming for us this next year with Carson Palmer will not be an Oakland Raider in 2013. Palmer will get a nice restructuring bonus of $11.65 million this season so the Raiders can drop his base salary to only $825,000 for 2012, but after that, his base contract balloons to $13 million and $15 million in 2013 and 2014. That’s Tom Brady money for a quarterback who had three more picks than touchdowns last year.


    Here can get the idea and see why RM said what he said about Huff .There's nothing wrong with locking a player into a big deal if he's played well during his rookie contract, of course; we're focusing here on guys who struggled during their entire four- or five-year deals and still got a second big contract from the same team. These are often inconsistent players who showed flashes of brilliance, causing their teams to be petrified with the idea of losing them to somebody who will elicit more consistent success out of them. Huff's a good example, as a seventh overall pick who never really stuck the landing as a starter at safety for the Raiders. Despite that, Oakland gave him a four-year, $32 million contract2 last offseason that guaranteed him $16 million. The only reason new general manager Reggie McKenzie didn't cut him this offseason is because Oakland owed him $8 million in guaranteed money whether he was in their organization or not.

    That was too much money to put into the already dead money we had just ate with paying this to Routt , Wimbley , and Boss couldn't afford to eat this of Huff's too .

    New CBA NFL Salary Caps

    Like any successful business owner, the most financially savvy NFL teams strive to get the most "bang" for their buck. For 2012, teams have to stay within a $120.6 million salary cap -- up from $120 million in 2011.

    The cap is determined by a complicated formula that changed with last year's collective bargaining agreement.

    The formula uses team revenue data for the past year, minus league benefits and multiplied by percentages based on the collective bargaining agreement. Failure to stay under the cap can bring about penalties, such as fines or forfeiture of draft picks.

    Included in the new salary cap is a revenue sharing agreement. Players receive 55% of national media revenue, 45% of NFL ventures revenue and 40% of local club revenue. Minimum salaries increased 10%, made changes to the length and scale of rookie contracts and made a number of other changes to promote player safety and health including reduced off-season programs and team activities.

    New Rules, Few Guarantees

    Now that you know how much money teams have to work with, let's look at individual salaries. Many NFL players have contracts worth millions of dollars. Peyton Manning, for example, had a $23 million contract for 2011. Even with a neck injury that kept him benched for most of the 2011 season, he was the highest paid NFL player in the league.


    But these contracts aren't guaranteed. If the Colts had decided to cut Manning during the 2011 season, he wouldn't have been entitled to the full $23 million.

    Teams can cut a player at any time, and if they do so before the season, they aren't liable for the player’s salary. Imagine a player who signs a 5-year, $65 million contract. The NFL contracts can back-load that salary in the last two or three years of the contract. The players are often cut or contracts are renegotiated before those salaries are paid in full.

    The NFL has set new rules to combat this practice, including preventing teams from increasing a player's salary by 30% or more from year to year. This protects the players, and also keeps the teams from finding ways to cheat the salary cap.

    NFL players can be cut at any time for any reason and would only be entitled to "guaranteed money" in their contracts. Guaranteed money is a portion of the total salary that is paid regardless of whether the player is injured or cut. With the frequency of injuries in the NFL, it's easy to see why signing bonuses and guaranteed money are so important to players.

    The Bonus Structure

    Many players' salaries count on big signing bonuses, which are paid at the time of signing in full (a big win for the player) but are amortized to count toward the salary cap over the length of the contract (a win for the team). This practice is called the Deion Sanders rule, named after the former Dallas Cowboys cornerback. Back when bonuses didn't count toward the salary cap, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tried to pay Sanders almost exclusively through a signing bonus, which wouldn't count towards the team's salary cap at all.

    There are also incentive bonuses for players, which are divided into two categories: "likely to be earned" or "not likely to be earned." An example of a bonus that is likely to be earned would be if Tom Brady had a Pro Bowl bonus. Barring strange circumstances, he will make the Pro Bowl team, so this money is taken out of the year's salary cap even before the bonus is paid.

    Bonuses not likely to be earned might be something like a 5,000-yard passing season for the Washington Redskins' Rex Grossman or a Super Bowl win for Cowboys' quarterback Tony Romo. Either way, these bonuses would count toward the salary cap the next year.

    There are even bonuses for attending off-season workouts or reporting on time. These are considered likely to be earned, so they are already factored into the salary cap.

    The Franchise Tag

    We’ve all heard about our favorite team dishing out a "franchise tag" on a player. The Saints' recent franchise tag on quarterback Drew Brees has certainly brought the concept into focus. But what exactly does it mean?

    A franchise tag is a way to sign a player to a one-year deal without having to negotiate salary. Teams usually utilize the franchise tag on a valuable player that they either cannot afford to sign a long-term deal, or a player who is risky to sign for multiple years -- such an older or injury-prone player.

    The salary of a franchised player is decided by averaging the salary of players who have been franchised at a particular position for the past five years. In the previous collective bargaining agreement, the salary was based on an average of the five highest salaries at a given position, so salaries for franchise players have dropped dramatically in the new collective bargaining agreement.
    foodisgood70 likes this.

  8. #53
    LINQ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KeiserSoze34 View Post
    You guys are hilarious....you all act as we don't need a qb too....lmfao!
    Yes let's replace the only guy worth a damn on this team. Stop living up to the Raider fan stereotype and embarrassing the rest of us.

  9. #54
    foodisgood70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metallica0688 View Post
    Here to help let you see what is likely coming for us this next year with Carson Palmer will not be an Oakland Raider in 2013. Palmer will get a nice restructuring bonus of $11.65 million this season so the Raiders can drop his base salary to only $825,000 for 2012, but after that, his base contract balloons to $13 million and $15 million in 2013 and 2014. That’s Tom Brady money for a quarterback who had three more picks than touchdowns last year.


    Here can get the idea and see why RM said what he said about Huff .There's nothing wrong with locking a player into a big deal if he's played well during his rookie contract, of course; we're focusing here on guys who struggled during their entire four- or five-year deals and still got a second big contract from the same team. These are often inconsistent players who showed flashes of brilliance, causing their teams to be petrified with the idea of losing them to somebody who will elicit more consistent success out of them. Huff's a good example, as a seventh overall pick who never really stuck the landing as a starter at safety for the Raiders. Despite that, Oakland gave him a four-year, $32 million contract2 last offseason that guaranteed him $16 million. The only reason new general manager Reggie McKenzie didn't cut him this offseason is because Oakland owed him $8 million in guaranteed money whether he was in their organization or not.

    That was too much money to put into the already dead money we had just ate with paying this to Routt , Wimbley , and Boss couldn't afford to eat this of Huff's too .

    New CBA NFL Salary Caps

    Like any successful business owner, the most financially savvy NFL teams strive to get the most "bang" for their buck. For 2012, teams have to stay within a $120.6 million salary cap -- up from $120 million in 2011.

    The cap is determined by a complicated formula that changed with last year's collective bargaining agreement.

    The formula uses team revenue data for the past year, minus league benefits and multiplied by percentages based on the collective bargaining agreement. Failure to stay under the cap can bring about penalties, such as fines or forfeiture of draft picks.

    Included in the new salary cap is a revenue sharing agreement. Players receive 55% of national media revenue, 45% of NFL ventures revenue and 40% of local club revenue. Minimum salaries increased 10%, made changes to the length and scale of rookie contracts and made a number of other changes to promote player safety and health including reduced off-season programs and team activities.

    New Rules, Few Guarantees

    Now that you know how much money teams have to work with, let's look at individual salaries. Many NFL players have contracts worth millions of dollars. Peyton Manning, for example, had a $23 million contract for 2011. Even with a neck injury that kept him benched for most of the 2011 season, he was the highest paid NFL player in the league.


    But these contracts aren't guaranteed. If the Colts had decided to cut Manning during the 2011 season, he wouldn't have been entitled to the full $23 million.

    Teams can cut a player at any time, and if they do so before the season, they aren't liable for the player’s salary. Imagine a player who signs a 5-year, $65 million contract. The NFL contracts can back-load that salary in the last two or three years of the contract. The players are often cut or contracts are renegotiated before those salaries are paid in full.

    The NFL has set new rules to combat this practice, including preventing teams from increasing a player's salary by 30% or more from year to year. This protects the players, and also keeps the teams from finding ways to cheat the salary cap.

    NFL players can be cut at any time for any reason and would only be entitled to "guaranteed money" in their contracts. Guaranteed money is a portion of the total salary that is paid regardless of whether the player is injured or cut. With the frequency of injuries in the NFL, it's easy to see why signing bonuses and guaranteed money are so important to players.

    The Bonus Structure

    Many players' salaries count on big signing bonuses, which are paid at the time of signing in full (a big win for the player) but are amortized to count toward the salary cap over the length of the contract (a win for the team). This practice is called the Deion Sanders rule, named after the former Dallas Cowboys cornerback. Back when bonuses didn't count toward the salary cap, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tried to pay Sanders almost exclusively through a signing bonus, which wouldn't count towards the team's salary cap at all.

    There are also incentive bonuses for players, which are divided into two categories: "likely to be earned" or "not likely to be earned." An example of a bonus that is likely to be earned would be if Tom Brady had a Pro Bowl bonus. Barring strange circumstances, he will make the Pro Bowl team, so this money is taken out of the year's salary cap even before the bonus is paid.

    Bonuses not likely to be earned might be something like a 5,000-yard passing season for the Washington Redskins' Rex Grossman or a Super Bowl win for Cowboys' quarterback Tony Romo. Either way, these bonuses would count toward the salary cap the next year.

    There are even bonuses for attending off-season workouts or reporting on time. These are considered likely to be earned, so they are already factored into the salary cap.

    The Franchise Tag

    We’ve all heard about our favorite team dishing out a "franchise tag" on a player. The Saints' recent franchise tag on quarterback Drew Brees has certainly brought the concept into focus. But what exactly does it mean?

    A franchise tag is a way to sign a player to a one-year deal without having to negotiate salary. Teams usually utilize the franchise tag on a valuable player that they either cannot afford to sign a long-term deal, or a player who is risky to sign for multiple years -- such an older or injury-prone player.

    The salary of a franchised player is decided by averaging the salary of players who have been franchised at a particular position for the past five years. In the previous collective bargaining agreement, the salary was based on an average of the five highest salaries at a given position, so salaries for franchise players have dropped dramatically in the new collective bargaining agreement.
    Dude, do you seriously write these things up yourself?? If so, I'm impressed. If not, I'M NEVER TALKING TO YOU AGAIN!


  10. #55
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    Would be nice but there has to be another team between the Raiders and Bills who want a QB for this to work. No idea if that's the case.

  11. #56
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    I don't watch to much collage football but why is every one saying there is no future franchise QBs in this years draft????I mean do I really got make a list of franchise QBs that got over looked and passed on in the first round because some couches and GMs thought the same thing?????

    I'm just saying some guys get over looked that could be a diamond in the rough.none of you guys are NFL scouts or talent evaluators are you????

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raidaguy831 View Post
    I don't watch to much collage football but why is every one saying there is no future franchise QBs in this years draft????I mean do I really got make a list of franchise QBs that got over looked and passed on in the first round because some couches and GMs thought the same thing?????

    I'm just saying some guys get over looked that could be a diamond in the rough.none of you guys are NFL scouts or talent evaluators are you????
    I dont think anyone is saying there isnt a diamond in the rough or someone who turns out to be good.Its just there is nobody who looks like a lock that a team will overpay to move up and take like last year.

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