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Thread: Yet another Pryor thread, but different question

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by foodisgood70 View Post
    Wrong again! Show me the post where I said that, because it doesn't exist. You make it too easy bro!! Seriously, have you ever been right about anything??
    Lol that was prob me, funny to read the posts I'm missing out on though. Sorry.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by agular9 View Post
    Lol that was prob me, funny to read the posts I'm missing out on though. Sorry.
    TBH it could be a lot of people, but the fact that he was wrong yet a-f*cking-gain just makes it so, so priceless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carboran View Post
    Dude, that in no way shape or form answered my question.


    It is quite simple.

    How many games do you give him to prove himself? i.e. Please fill in the blank. "If after ______ games Pryor is not getting it done, we need to move on."


    Thats the absolute wrong way to evaluate him.

    You start him ad you look at how he reads defenses, how does he call audibles, how is his clock management, can he extend plays, his mobility, his accuracy, decision making, does the team play hard for him...those are the types of things to say...not if he loses 4 games he's done. In 4 games you may say he is the guy to build on...you might say he is doing some things but not others...if he is failing, why?

    If you say, give hime 6 games. In those 6 games, the defense gives up 45 points a game. He is playing against mediocre talent in the 2nd half and looks amazing. Can't judge him by that. So it depends. Gotta have him in a good amount of situations to judge whether luck is involved, good or bad. Did he close his eyes, chuck it and the receiver made a play? Or did he make all the right decisions but someone missed a block and he was blindsided in his throwing motion, causing a pick.

    If he flat out sucks at everything then 4 games is enough, but that will probably not happen. He will do some things very well, and some things not so well, so it may take an entire season to evaluate him. How long did they give Russell?
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    Quote Originally Posted by danax View Post
    If a head coach starts a 3rd string QB, it's clear he's in evaluation mode, not win mode. Should the other players now sacrifice their bodies by putting out 100% effort if the game is an evaluation game? Coaches get paid to win games. He can evaluate with "packages" without looking obvious.
    Kinda like Tebow in Denver? Started the season as the 3rd string QB, and ended starting a playoff game. 2nd string Quinn never got in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RaiderFootball View Post
    I'm just curious as to whether people realize this or not........

    If Pryor is worth anything, why is he the third stringer and not the back up?


    Wow. So Lineart is the backup not because he is better (he may be, but how would they know?) he is the backup because he was in Houston with Knapp and knows his offense better than anyone on the team. If Palmer goes down the backup has the full playbook under his belt.

    How do they not know who is better? Well, the starter gets 90% of the snaps in practice. The backup the other 10%. How many does the 3rd string get? He may run the scout team, and play with the practice squad players. He is also told to play like the opposing QB that week so the defense can try to prepare. How does playing like every other QB in the league and not like yourself help in evaluation? It doesn't. Thats why they dont know what they have.

    Not saying he is the answer, or is better than Palmer, but he may present a far more difficult challenge to defenses as he is unpredictable and he is an athlete.

    The key to him getting a fair shot is for them to have a playbook that suits HIS unique skills. Is he better at being the prototypical QB than Palmer, or even Lineart? NOPE. But is he a better option if they have a playbook that moves the pockets, runs the QB often, and takes advantages of his physical gifts...

    Notice when Tebow started in Denver the offense looked completely different. Smart coach. Adapt the offense for your players...they didnt make him try to be what he isn't.

    While I'd love to see what Pryor has, but I'm not confident this coaching staff could take advantage of the the All Madden team.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrhone View Post
    Kinda like Tebow in Denver? Started the season as the 3rd string QB, and ended starting a playoff game. 2nd string Quinn never got in.
    True. But they doing that to try to win in the midst of a post season bid. Palmer has done decently.

    Best chance Tyrelle has is to play well enough to warrant more playing time in the final two games. A last quarter drive for a win would light the fanbase up. We've lacked clutch for so long now.

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    ecnirp is offline Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
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    This is actually a difficult question.

    If you watched Russell Wilson's first 3 games you might have thought he was a bust (well not a bust...just not ready to play.)


    I thought for sure the Eagles would go another direction at QB next year. Foles played bad his first couple of games, but turned it on late.

    So technically...yes he would need more games to evaluate him. But realistically he wont get that chance.

    If he does get 1 start. He needs to do what Colin Kaepernick did in order for the team to lean his direction.

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    Yet another Pryor thread, but different question

    If he doesn't play this Sunday I really don't see him playing this season. Wouldn't have his first time playing in the league on the road.

    In all seriousness though, I doubt that he's going to be any star at QB. If I'm wrong (and I hope I am), it'll be great for the Raiders. If I'm right, big deal, he becomes irrelevant to the league.
    Do it once, do it right. Or don't do it at all.
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  9. #39
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    Until 10 days ago Shane Lechler was the Raiders 3rd string QB.
    For the first 12 games of the season Pryor was in street clothes watching Palmer stagnate the offense and throw interceptions.


    Quote Originally Posted by RaiderFootball View Post
    I'm just curious as to whether people realize this or not........

    If Pryor is worth anything, why is he the third stringer and not the back up?

  10. #40
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    Size: At 6í6, 233 pounds, Pryor has better than prototypical size at the quarterback position. His height allows him to see the field without much obstruction, and increases his ability to find throwing lanes with regularity. Pryorís weight will enable him to absorb some of the pounding he will take at the next level.
    Once DEs and LBs get a hand on Pryor in the backfield, he has proven to be very difficult to bring down due to his size; much like Ben Rothlisberger.

    Arm Strength: Pryor has all the arm strength necessary to make every NFL throw. Pryor also has more than enough arm strength to hit his receivers in stride 50 yards or more down the field without putting a tremendous amount of air under the football. He has also displayed the ability to connect on the 15 yard out.

    Accuracy: Though Pryor has all the arm strength necessary to play at the next level, accuracy could very well be his downfall. Pryor has very good timing with his receivers on the deep ball, consistently delivering the ball to his receivers in stride. Unfortunately, the deep ball is the most impressive throw Pryor has in his arsenal at this point in his young career. Due to his poor mechanics, Pryor struggles with the stick throws seemingly throwing the football with very little, to no anticipation at all. Pryor also has a propensity to throw high once his receivers turn around to sit in the holes of zone defenses. His lack of consistency with his footwork leads to some of those high throws, resulting in incomplete passes, as well as his receiverís inability to maximize yardage after the catch. Pryor often gets away with this as a college QB; however he will not get away with this in the NFL. If he does not improve upon his accuracy, a lot of those overthrown balls will become interceptions at the next level. While Pryor might have achieved a solid completion rate of 65% last season, it couldíve been a lot worse. Letís be mindful of the fact that Pryor is surrounded by a group of very sure handed receivers who really know how to adjust to the football, making some spectacular grabs for him over the course of the year.

    Mechanical: When Pryor is referred to as an unfinished product, raw or a project, his mechanics are essentially the derivation for the aforementioned descriptions. Pryorís feet are very inactive in his drops and only begin to hasten if he is being pressured. When pressured, Pryor becomes very frenetic in the pocket and he does not keep his eyes down field while buying time with his legs to find open receivers. Pryor, naturally a long strider, fails to follow through with his throws, unnecessarily throwing off of his back foot. Throwing off of his back foot resulted in some throws getting away from him and sailing over the head of his intended target.

    Once Pryor sets his back foot, he has a tendency to sink his hips (especially on the deep ball), making him significantly shorter in the pocket than his actual height of 6í6. Because his release point is much lower than his height would suggest, Pryor is susceptible to his passes being batted down. He does not throw a pretty football as he does not follow through on his throws. The fact that he does not follow through results in the ball looking more like a knuckleball compared to a spiral. Pryor also has a bit of a windup which has an adverse affect on the speed of his release.

    With all of these flaws in his mechanics, Pryor has escaped relatively unscathed at the collegiate level. Iím curious to see how motivated Pryor will be to change his mechanics if itís been working for him thus far? If Pryor does not improve upon his mechanics, he will indeed be subjected to a position change at the next level.

    Mobility: Pryor has been one of the more mobile QBs in college football the past 3 years. Pryor does not have much wiggle to his game; however it has no barring on the impact of his ability to run the football. What he lacks in his ability to make defenders miss, particularly at the 2nd level, he more than makes up for it with his outstanding stiff arm and sheer strength. Iím not a believer in the 4.3 40 yard time Pryor recorded over the summer, however I have no doubt that Pryor runs a 4.4 in the 40 at the very least.

    When scrambling, Pryor often times frustrated me as it seemed to take him a while to build up speed when initially deciding to leave the pocket. Though Pryorís top end speed is impressive, he tends to strain a lot to run once in the open field as his form appears to breakdown considerably. I only wish Pryor were more sudden when initially looking to leave the pocket.

    Pre/Post snap reads: We get it; college coaches are not responsible for getting a QB ready for the next level, theyíre responsible for getting their programs wins. With that being said, Pryor will be significantly behind the curve as he has almost no experience checking in and out of plays. OSUís plays are called from the sideline through a series of hand gestures from the offensive coordinator. Hand signals indicate tempo, formation as well as routes and protections for the offensive linemen. Routes will change dependent upon whether secondary is in Cover 1 or a Cover 2 shell.

    Pryor also was only asked to read just one side of the field during his time at OSU which is typical of many spread offenses featuring mobile Quarterbacks. Any team that is thinking of acquiring Pryor would be best served allowing him to sit and learn for a year or two before being considered for any quality snaps under center.

    Intangibles: Due to his passion and zeal for the game, Pryor struggled in this particular area especially early in his career. Often times, Pryorís emotions would get the best of him as he could be seen yelling and screaming at his receivers during timeouts. Once he began to display a calmer demeanor, his team began to win the big games against teams like Oregon and Arkansas. While I donít believe his focus intensifies during big moments in a game, I donít believe the pressure rattles him much either.
    In my estimation, Pryor has grown as a leader for the Buckeyes. Should he display the same attitude on the field he did toward the tail end of his career at OSU, heíll be well received in any NFL locker room.

    Pryor is a prospect with a long way to go in order to play QB effectively in the NFL. Heís a bit of a project, but if heís placed in the proper environment conducive to learning, he could flourish.
    Carboran and foodisgood70 like this.

  11. #41
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    He needs more time. He is essentially a rookie. Lame decision to play him anything more than some series. It's easy to see a train wreck is on the horizon, that will be an excuse to send him out of town. Watch how this goes down Pryor fans.

  12. #42
    ecnirp is offline Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUSTWINBABY9111 View Post
    He needs more time. He is essentially a rookie. Lame decision to play him anything more than some series. It's easy to see a train wreck is on the horizon, that will be an excuse to send him out of town. Watch how this goes down Pryor fans.

    Well...that may be the case.

    Its the exact same thing that happened with Tebow. The fans wanted Tebow, management and the coaches did not. They put him out there so when he failed they could move on from him. Strange thing was....Tebow proved them both right. Tebow proved he couldnt throw at this level to the coaches/management, but proved to the fans that he can be exciting and win games.

    It seems to me that Reggie is going one of two ways...Get Pryor started or done with. Let him go out there....if he plays well...fine he's back on the team next year....if he's terrible...fans will shut up about him and wont care if he's cut in the off season.

    So Pryor really does have his career riding on the next couple of weeks.

    The BEST scenario would have been us winning games, which means no talk of Pryor, he just learns like any other QB and works his way up over the years.

    Ideally....It would have been him beating out Leinart for the backup spot, he plays a Kaepernick like Pistol Offense role for a couple plays...while Carson is the starter winning us games.

    Sadly the team and season is a disaster. So people have "hope" in the unknown in Pryor....even though it likely wont work.
    heitz75 likes this.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrhone View Post
    Thats the absolute wrong way to evaluate him.

    You start him ad you look at how he reads defenses, how does he call audibles, how is his clock management, can he extend plays, his mobility, his accuracy, decision making, does the team play hard for him...those are the types of things to say...not if he loses 4 games he's done. In 4 games you may say he is the guy to build on...you might say he is doing some things but not others...if he is failing, why?

    If you say, give hime 6 games. In those 6 games, the defense gives up 45 points a game. He is playing against mediocre talent in the 2nd half and looks amazing. Can't judge him by that. So it depends. Gotta have him in a good amount of situations to judge whether luck is involved, good or bad. Did he close his eyes, chuck it and the receiver made a play? Or did he make all the right decisions but someone missed a block and he was blindsided in his throwing motion, causing a pick.

    If he flat out sucks at everything then 4 games is enough, but that will probably not happen. He will do some things very well, and some things not so well, so it may take an entire season to evaluate him. How long did they give Russell?
    I have to say that Palmer does well on a lot of those criteria. Yet he is evaluated solely on W/Ls by a lot of people on this board. That has been the issue with the Raiders. Single players are evaluated on W's, regardless of how much the other ccomponents of the team suck. Last I checked, Football was played by 33 dudes.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metallica0688 View Post
    Size: At 6í6, 233 pounds, Pryor has better than prototypical size at the quarterback position. His height allows him to see the field without much obstruction, and increases his ability to find throwing lanes with regularity. Pryorís weight will enable him to absorb some of the pounding he will take at the next level.
    Once DEs and LBs get a hand on Pryor in the backfield, he has proven to be very difficult to bring down due to his size; much like Ben Rothlisberger.

    Arm Strength: Pryor has all the arm strength necessary to make every NFL throw. Pryor also has more than enough arm strength to hit his receivers in stride 50 yards or more down the field without putting a tremendous amount of air under the football. He has also displayed the ability to connect on the 15 yard out.

    Accuracy: Though Pryor has all the arm strength necessary to play at the next level, accuracy could very well be his downfall. Pryor has very good timing with his receivers on the deep ball, consistently delivering the ball to his receivers in stride. Unfortunately, the deep ball is the most impressive throw Pryor has in his arsenal at this point in his young career. Due to his poor mechanics, Pryor struggles with the stick throws seemingly throwing the football with very little, to no anticipation at all. Pryor also has a propensity to throw high once his receivers turn around to sit in the holes of zone defenses. His lack of consistency with his footwork leads to some of those high throws, resulting in incomplete passes, as well as his receiverís inability to maximize yardage after the catch. Pryor often gets away with this as a college QB; however he will not get away with this in the NFL. If he does not improve upon his accuracy, a lot of those overthrown balls will become interceptions at the next level. While Pryor might have achieved a solid completion rate of 65% last season, it couldíve been a lot worse. Letís be mindful of the fact that Pryor is surrounded by a group of very sure handed receivers who really know how to adjust to the football, making some spectacular grabs for him over the course of the year.

    Mechanical: When Pryor is referred to as an unfinished product, raw or a project, his mechanics are essentially the derivation for the aforementioned descriptions. Pryorís feet are very inactive in his drops and only begin to hasten if he is being pressured. When pressured, Pryor becomes very frenetic in the pocket and he does not keep his eyes down field while buying time with his legs to find open receivers. Pryor, naturally a long strider, fails to follow through with his throws, unnecessarily throwing off of his back foot. Throwing off of his back foot resulted in some throws getting away from him and sailing over the head of his intended target.

    Once Pryor sets his back foot, he has a tendency to sink his hips (especially on the deep ball), making him significantly shorter in the pocket than his actual height of 6í6. Because his release point is much lower than his height would suggest, Pryor is susceptible to his passes being batted down. He does not throw a pretty football as he does not follow through on his throws. The fact that he does not follow through results in the ball looking more like a knuckleball compared to a spiral. Pryor also has a bit of a windup which has an adverse affect on the speed of his release.

    With all of these flaws in his mechanics, Pryor has escaped relatively unscathed at the collegiate level. Iím curious to see how motivated Pryor will be to change his mechanics if itís been working for him thus far? If Pryor does not improve upon his mechanics, he will indeed be subjected to a position change at the next level.

    Mobility: Pryor has been one of the more mobile QBs in college football the past 3 years. Pryor does not have much wiggle to his game; however it has no barring on the impact of his ability to run the football. What he lacks in his ability to make defenders miss, particularly at the 2nd level, he more than makes up for it with his outstanding stiff arm and sheer strength. Iím not a believer in the 4.3 40 yard time Pryor recorded over the summer, however I have no doubt that Pryor runs a 4.4 in the 40 at the very least.

    When scrambling, Pryor often times frustrated me as it seemed to take him a while to build up speed when initially deciding to leave the pocket. Though Pryorís top end speed is impressive, he tends to strain a lot to run once in the open field as his form appears to breakdown considerably. I only wish Pryor were more sudden when initially looking to leave the pocket.

    Pre/Post snap reads: We get it; college coaches are not responsible for getting a QB ready for the next level, theyíre responsible for getting their programs wins. With that being said, Pryor will be significantly behind the curve as he has almost no experience checking in and out of plays. OSUís plays are called from the sideline through a series of hand gestures from the offensive coordinator. Hand signals indicate tempo, formation as well as routes and protections for the offensive linemen. Routes will change dependent upon whether secondary is in Cover 1 or a Cover 2 shell.

    Pryor also was only asked to read just one side of the field during his time at OSU which is typical of many spread offenses featuring mobile Quarterbacks. Any team that is thinking of acquiring Pryor would be best served allowing him to sit and learn for a year or two before being considered for any quality snaps under center.

    Intangibles: Due to his passion and zeal for the game, Pryor struggled in this particular area especially early in his career. Often times, Pryorís emotions would get the best of him as he could be seen yelling and screaming at his receivers during timeouts. Once he began to display a calmer demeanor, his team began to win the big games against teams like Oregon and Arkansas. While I donít believe his focus intensifies during big moments in a game, I donít believe the pressure rattles him much either.
    In my estimation, Pryor has grown as a leader for the Buckeyes. Should he display the same attitude on the field he did toward the tail end of his career at OSU, heíll be well received in any NFL locker room.

    Pryor is a prospect with a long way to go in order to play QB effectively in the NFL. Heís a bit of a project, but if heís placed in the proper environment conducive to learning, he could flourish.

    Did you write this? Because this is damn good analysis

  15. #45
    NoClapsPlease is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUSTWINBABY9111 View Post
    He needs more time. He is essentially a rookie. Lame decision to play him anything more than some series. It's easy to see a train wreck is on the horizon, that will be an excuse to send him out of town. Watch how this goes down Pryor fans.
    the train wreck has been here for 3 months now, sorry to tell you.

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