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Thread: The "Coryell" Offense(long)

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    The "Coryell" Offense(long)

    Another name for the type of offense that Norv Turner is implementing in Oakland is the "Air Coryell Offense." Other coaches in the NFL, such as Joe Gibbs and Dick Vermeil, run this offense. The concept of this offense: Throw the ball down field and utilize a running game.

    This type of offense was prevalent in the old American Football league back in the 1960's! Even after the AFL and NFL merged, many teams utilized this type of offense, including the Raiders, who won Super Bowls in 1976, 1980, and 1984, and becoming the winning franchise in sports during that time era. It wasn't until the early 1980's, when Bill Walsh made the West Coast offense popular, that the vertical long-ball began to lose it's popularity. Even after the west coast offense took over, the Coryell offense did not die alltogether. The Dallas Cowboys utilized this type of offense back in the early 90's when Norv Turner was offensive coordinator, and along with a great defense, won 3 Super Bowls in 4 years. The St. Louis Rams won the Super Bowl in 1999 using this type of offense along with a solid defense.

    The name of the Coryell offense comes from Don Coryell, the San Diego Chargers coach who ran this offense back in the 1970's and 1980's. Don Coryell, however, did not invent this type of offense. That belongs to Sid Gillman, a coach in the American football league, whom Al Davis worked under before before owning the Raiders. Sid Gillman insisted on throwing deep, downfield passes instead of short passes. Members of Gillmans coaching staff, which also included Dick Vermiel, have adhered to the vertical passing game ever since.

    I like to call the Coryell Offense the "Anti" West Coast Offense. The West Coast Offense utilizes short, horizontal passing routs, and throwing the ball to the running backs and tight ends and much as the recievers. Quarterbacks usually take 3-5 step drops in the West Coast Offense.
    The Coryell Offense utilizes vertical, usually intermediate to long passes. Many times, play-action passes are used in the Coryell Offense. Quarterbacks in the Coryell offense usually take 5-7 step drops.

    The Coryell Offense has the potential for offenses to score alot of points and put up big statistics, but there are several requirements for this offense to be successful:
    1. Recievers are usually quick and speedy, so as to get down the field faster and create seperation. Cliff Brach fit this type of offense perfectly with his speed and degree of seperation. Good hands is just as important. This is what made the difference between Cliff Brach and James Jett. Randy Moss should be able to thrive in this system.
    2. Quarterbacks in the Coryell offense have to be able to throw the ball long and with accuracy. Usually, quarterbacks in this system are bigger, pocket passers who have a big arm.
    3. The running game is probably the most crucial element to running the Coryell offense effectively. Running backs in this type of offense are usually bigger, power running backs. Teams need to have a workhorse running back, who can pound the ball down the middle and be able to carry the ball 25+ times a game, so to take the pressure off the passing game. Norv Turner has always had a workhorse running back in his system, such as Emmitt Smith, Stephen Davis, and Ricky Williams. One of the reasons we struggled last year was because we didn't have a running game, which forced us to pass. Teams knew this.
    4. Tight ends in the Coryell offense are usually utilized for blocking more than recieving.. They are bigger tight-ends who are more physical. This is the reason why Courtney Anderson is starting in our offense, and this is the reason why recieving oriented tight ends Teyo Johnson and Doug Jolley are gone!
    5. Offensive lineman are usually huge and massive in the Coryell Offense. When the west coast offense became popular, teams such as the 49ers and Denver Broncos were able to get away with using smaller, quicker offensive lineman, because passes got off quicker. Offensive lineman in the Coryell offense are huge for 2 reasons:1) so the quarterback has time to allow the recievers can get down field and get open. 2)So to open holes for the running back. An example of a massive offensive line would be the Dallas Cowboy's the the early 1990's, and the Kansas City Chiefs offensive line.

    If assembled correctly, the Coryell offense can create nightmares for opposing teams. It puts defenses into a dilemna. Do you bring your players closer to the line to defend against the run, leaving the secondary vulnerable to big plays down field, or do you defend against the pass, weakening run support and opening up the running game.

    The Raiders have the potential to run the Coryell offense very well. We have an array of wideouts who are down field threats(Moss, Porter, Curry, Gabriel, Whitted), a potentially explosive power running back in Lamont Jordan, a big blocking tight-end in Courtney Anderson, and a big, massive offensive line(Sims 6'5 300 lbs, Walker 6'8 345 lbs, Grove 6'4 300 lbs, Stone 6'5 325 lbs, Badger 6'4 320, Gallery 6'7 325). Collins has the arm to throw the ball deep. Hopefully, it can all gel perfectly.

    On a side note, although it's not required to run the Coryell offense, a solid defense is almost always required to win with the Coryell offense. Look at the St. Louis Rams in 1999, look at the Dallas Cowboys of the 1990's, the Raiders of the 1960's, 1970's and early 1980's, and the Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970's, all of whom are teams who ran this type of offense. Defense is very important. Ask the Indianapolis Colts and Kansas City Chiefs how far a great offense with no defense gets you!

    I'm not a professional football expert, so I'm sure I left stuff out! But I hope this explains alot about what we are doing!

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    Sorry. But the offense you talk about generated in the 60s and early 70s with Al Davis. Lamonica was the prototypical longball QB. He only threw the intermediate and deep balls. The Raiders always had the big FB (who ran the ball, not the HB).

    What I would say to you is this.

    EXPECT A LOT OF 3 WIDE-OUT SETS THIS YEAR.

    Turner knows that our best offensive weapon is our WR corp.
    The TE will say in to block when we run, or Jordan will block and the TE (Anderson) run a quick out.

    Jordan and Anderson will give us the underneath, whilst the rest spread the field.

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    And to paraphrase Al Davis.

    "We don't take what they give us, we take what we want."


    "For those Corners that are playing out there on the corner, you know the Raiders are coming at you and they're coming at you on top. That was Raider football."

    With Moss, Porter, Curry, Gabriel, Morant et al the Raider are going to take what THEY WANT.

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    Excellent post Jon. Nice work.

    If I may add, the architecht for Coryell and his deciples was Sid Gillman who led the Chargers in the 60s. Al Davis tutored under Gilman and used his passing expertise to good use with the Raiders after taking control of the team.

    In fact, it was Al Davis who was instrumental in the signing of Hall of Fame wide receiver Lance Alworth whom Gilman used as the catalyst of his wide open attack. When Alworth was inducted into the HOF, he asked Al Davis to introduce him.

    Davis went on to use Gilman's approach until he brought in John Gruden in 1998. Gruden brought the dink and dunk attack that fit and suited Rich Gannon so well. Although successful, old time Raider fans would cringe at this style of offense.

    Another deciple of Gilman was Bill Walsh. He gets too much credit for being the master of the passing game.

    What Gilman started, Coryell perfected. No team did it better. It will be interesting to see what this year's bunch will do under Turner. He was an excellent student of this attack and with the group he has, should be able to terrorize opponents.

    He has a big back, big and fast receivers, a solid tight end and a big offensive line. Should be fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bram Raider
    Sorry. But the offense you talk about generated in the 60s and early 70s with Al Davis. Lamonica was the prototypical longball QB. He only threw the intermediate and deep balls. The Raiders always had the big FB (who ran the ball, not the HB).

    What I would say to you is this.

    EXPECT A LOT OF 3 WIDE-OUT SETS THIS YEAR.

    Turner knows that our best offensive weapon is our WR corp.
    The TE will say in to block when we run, or Jordan will block and the TE (Anderson) run a quick out.

    Jordan and Anderson will give us the underneath, whilst the rest spread the field.
    Yeah, Al Davis was the one who really utilized the long-ball and verticle passing game.

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    Very nice read..Very well though out post. rep for ya.
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    The Stretch offense is a high risk. Unlike dinking and dunking your opponents down field, this offense challenged defense first and foremost.

    You need a brusing line, a vertical wideout, and a pounding back to make this go. Your qb better be able to throw effeictive 10+ yard out routes if you want to do some damage.

    Minnesota, Kansas City, Washington, Oakland, Dallas, all run the stretch offense to some regularity.

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    Everyone is trending to the vertical/isolation offense.

    Bigger strong armed passers who let their backs and recievers make the big plays. It's what they're paid for. If your team can run downhill , go over the top then it will get points and hold the ball. Classic field position football.

    Walsh took his ideas to Paul Brown Sr. and the Cincinnati Bengals and the Ohio Valley offense became the West Coast offense.

    Gillman was always designing new passing plays. Al Davis matched that flare for forward thinking and took the base aspects of it to make a pure uniform philosophy of Vertical Excellence.

    John Madden found a way to balance this appetite for bombs and big plays with smashmouth style, Tom Flores likewise as Championship Raiders coaches. Oakland is back to playing that brand of football.

    The body shots and knockout punch of Heavyweight power, the speed and style of a marvelous middleweight. Al Davis developed the ultimate fighting machine of a team and wants a return to all-time tactics.

    Don't say we didn't warn you!

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    I was listening to the radio one day, and I can remember the announcer saying something that really stood out to me. He said that the vertical, deep ball is the real west coast offense because it literally comes from the west coast, innovated by Al Davis and coaches out here in California! Can't remember who it was that said that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonRaider
    I was listening to the radio one day, and I can remember the announcer saying something that really stood out to me. He said that the vertical, deep ball is the real west coast offense because it literally comes from the west coast, innovated by Al Davis and coaches out here in California! Can't remember who it was that said that.
    Interesting. When you consider the impact Sid Gillman and Al Davis had on the game, it's hard to disagree with the dj's assement of the founding fathers of west coast offense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Murder
    Everyone is trending to the vertical/isolation offense.

    Bigger strong armed passers who let their backs and recievers make the big plays. It's what they're paid for. If your team can run downhill , go over the top then it will get points and hold the ball. Classic field position football.

    Walsh took his ideas to Paul Brown Sr. and the Cincinnati Bengals and the Ohio Valley offense became the West Coast offense.

    Gillman was always designing new passing plays. Al Davis matched that flare for forward thinking and took the base aspects of it to make a pure uniform philosophy of Vertical Excellence.

    John Madden found a way to balance this appetite for bombs and big plays with smashmouth style, Tom Flores likewise as Championship Raiders coaches. Oakland is back to playing that brand of football.

    The body shots and knockout punch of Heavyweight power, the speed and style of a marvelous middleweight. Al Davis developed the ultimate fighting machine of a team and wants a return to all-time tactics.

    Don't say we didn't warn you!
    Add the fact that Moss has different gears and he makes the stretch offense goes.

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    You mean the corHELL system. We look completely out of sync out there. It's all about timing unfortunately we have none of that. We need to get a red zone and pass offense coordinators.

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    lol one of the football coaches at my school worked on Coach Coryell's staff at SDSU :p
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